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Gerard Butler GALS

LadyinRed

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About LadyinRed

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    Archie's Ocean GAL

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    http://www.sayhi.co.uk
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    Female
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    Scotland

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  1. No I have never heard it all in Scotland, if guys here said that to each other they'd be given a weird look!! Maybe younger teens/boys in ethnic gangs may use that phrase. In London and other English cities where there are more ethnic mixes it would probably be used. In Paisley and elsewhere in Scotland I honestly haven't heard it. Do the other Scots living in Scotland agree? Or is this something you hear about the place? LadyinRed
  2. The original article/discussion is here. (I'm confused by Lady's indication that the thread is closed, as it is very open. However, since we're discussing Scottish vernacular, I won't merge the threads. (That's not to say the MS won't merge it eventually! ... but it will stay put for now.) Bringing the thread back on topic, where does the term "chuff" come from? I've seen several Scots post, "I was 'chuffed.'" I THINK that's a "good thing." As an American, it reminds me of "chaffed," which is NOT a good thing! Well ... unless Gerry's the one who's done the chaffing! Hi, I did try to post underneath the original quote but couldn't get it to work, (sorry for confusing everyone in trying to figure out where the original article came from).... I grew up in Paisley which is approx 10 miles from Glasgow. The accent in Paisley is completely different from Glasgwegian accents. In Glasgow every part of the city has a different accent. In Paisley the accent is the same although some people in certain areas do sound more posh and may be more articulate. Some confusing things which may be said from people from Paisley (and Scotland) include "I'd like a roll in sausage.... this isn't a sausage roll, but normally a flat square sausage insinde a cirular roll(bap) other things to do with food would be to say "I'd like a roll in ham."... which would mean bacon inside a roll.... Lift your bonnet- means lift the hood of your car Open your boot- means the trunk of your car Bumper of your car- Fender of your car So if you are ever stopped by the police over here and they ask you to lift your bonnet and open your boot you'll know what they mean LOL.... Someone mentioned digestive biscuits, oh god I hate them, some people love them, they are circular, very dry and crumbly and some people dip them in their tea, sometimes people over here say that "that smells like a digestive biscuit" Irn Bru I don't like the taste but lots of Scottish people drink it, I'm sure there must be loads more wee things, if I think of any or if there is anything anyone wants to know about Paisley just let me know. Lady in Red
  3. In reply to the comment below (I couldn't post in that topic as it was closed), but in Scotland if people say they are going to "buy shopping" or they are "going for messages" this means that they are leaving to go and buy food shopping. This was written by an American on another part of the site: "Sorry but I'm reading & somewhat laughing. How do you "buy shopping"? Also I'm confused about the comment of something that happened 30 years ago. Gerry is about to be 40 in November. You aren't considered a "tot" at 9 or even 10. I'm guessing he left Paisley & moved to Canada at a much younger age meaning 30 years is too short of a time. Sorry it makes me giggle when someone can't write a proper article." So for all the Americans on here you now understand what Gerard means if he was sent to buy shopping when he was a boy. It would have probably been Galbraiths in Seedhill, that was the nearest supermarket in the 70's next to Ralston where he lived. Galbraiths is now Asda, and this area hasn't changed much since the 70's, apart from the Kelburn Cinema is now flats. Scotland is completely different to America in the respect that lots of supermarkets, shops etc are within walking distance to many houses. We don't have to leave housing estates to visit "malls." It is relatively safe to walk to shops etc in Scotland. Paisley is famous to quite a few people in recent years, as well as Gerard, they have David Tennant who is (Doctor Who) and the singer Paulo Nutini whose mum and dad's chippy is around the corner from the old County Bingo, the next street from where Toledo Junction was. ps. I grew up in Paisley till I was 10. LadyinRed
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