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Swansong

Gerry Distancing Himself?

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LOL Mel.

I didn't mean you were too wordy. You spoke volumes in a short paragraph there. I was verra impressed. :kisswink:

Gerry's performances have consistently "engaged" me in just about every role I've seen him in. I hope he recognizes in himself what a true talent he really has. He has been given a wonderful gift. If he has moments of not believing in himself, I hope he would, at times, at least be aware of the lasting impact he has made on many of us.

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LOL Mel.

I didn't mean you were too wordy. You spoke volumes in a short paragraph there. I was verra impressed. :kisswink:

Aye, I know Jill...I was just poking fun at myself a bit! And thank you again.

Gerry's performances have consistently "engaged" me in just about every role I've seen him in. I hope he recognizes in himself what a true talent he really has. He has been given a wonderful gift. If he has moments of not believing in himself, I hope he would, at times, at least be aware of the lasting impact he has made on many of us.

Hear hear, and amen sister! I could go on and on about the changes in my life due to Gerry's performances. And in many instances, the performance propells or snowballs something else that ends up being a lasting, positive impact.

~Mel

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I could not agree more, Mel.... your words are profound.

What artists like Gerry do, is so much more than entertain us.

I remember when I was in about the third grade, and my parents took me to see The Sound Of Music for the first time. That film had such a profound impact on my life, that even months after seeing it, I listened to my Sound of Music soundtrack, and sang with every single song. I had vivid dreams about that movie, and it was during that time, I discovered I could actually sing. I'll never forget the "Maria" costume my mother made for me. It was identical to the one worn by Julie Andrews as the novice nun. I wore that costume when I sung the title song for a our school's talent show.... my first ever public performance.

I liken my experience in watching POTO with my reaction to The Sound of Music. Both movies were life affirming and life changing for me, and both movies delivered a message I needed to hear.

I am reminded of Gerry's own experience with the movie Krull. He loves to tell the story about how he fell in love with the princess and even had vivid dreams that he was the hero in the movie, and she was his beautiful bride. He says seeing that movie made him realize he wanted more than anything, to be an actor.

At their best, movies are art, and NOT just another form of entertainment. Actors at their best, are artists, whose performances have the power to move us in profound ways. I believe REAL actors like Gerry, will always know that the story is more important than they are, and that is why you do not sense the man's own ego in his roles. He surrenders to his characters, because he know they have a story to tell.

I think most of us can tell the difference between a Star, and an actor, an artist.... and Gerry is indeed a true artist, capable of projecting our fears, longings and life experiences right through that screen.

The amazing thing is, while many of us discovered him through Phantom, and were so deeply moved by that film.... other fans have had equally profound and moving reactions to his other roles. So I think we can be certain, it's not just the Phantom, where Gerry gave something special to the role. He does this in many of his films, because he is an artist who is after more than fame and recognition.

I'll bet many of you can name movies, books or even paintings that touched you in some special fashion. I'll bet you even remember the theater where you saw the film. Art in all its forms is the language of the soul.... and Gerard James Butler speaks that language to our hearts.

No wonder he loves what he does!

Swannie

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This is an old interview, but I had never seen it! WOW.... it really confirms my own personal belief about Gerry's approach to acting, and that he does understand how films and characters impact film goers:

Enjoy!

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I could not agree more, Mel.... your words are profound.

What artists like Gerry do, is so much more than entertain us.

At their best, movies are art, and NOT just another form of entertainment. Actors at their best, are artists, whose performances have the power to move us in profound ways. I believe REAL actors like Gerry, will always know that the story is more important than they are, and that is why you do not sense the man's own ego in his roles. He surrenders to his characters, because he know they have a story to tell.

I think most of us can tell the difference between a Star, and an actor, an artist.... and Gerry is indeed a true artist, capable of projecting our fears, longings and life experiences right through that screen.

The amazing thing is, while many of us discovered him through Phantom, and were so deeply moved by that film.... other fans have had equally profound and moving reactions to his other roles. So I think we can be certain, it's not just the Phantom, where Gerry gave something special to the role. He does this in many of his films, because he is an artist who is after more than fame and recognition.

Art in all its forms is the language of the soul.... and Gerard James Butler speaks that language to our hearts.

No wonder he loves what he does!

Swannie

My God, Swann....who, what, how are you channeling to be this enlightened and eloquent??? I LOVE that you're writing this! The attention, dedication, passion and professionalism Gerry embellishes on his craft is the "hottest" thing about this amazing man! And I'm so glad that you recognize his true qualities and are able to relate them to us in such glorious words....and I do believe this..."Art in all its forms is the language of the soul!" And if G speaks that language to our Hearts...no wonder We love Him!....

PS...this kind of writing is also Art....you speak to our Hearts as well, Swann...Love Ya!

PS again....the interview above is wonderful! I've seen it before...but would've never known where to look for it....you are very good at finding these gems....another awesome gift you are willing to share with us...I, for one, am so glad you are as obsessed with G as you are!

Edited by Trouble

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This is an old interview, but I had never seen it! WOW.... it really confirms my own personal belief about Gerry's approach to acting, and that he does understand how films and characters impact film goers:

Enjoy!

Sweeeeet find, Swannie! I don't think I've seen that one either! :claphands:

Hey, this is my 6000th post... :D

~Mel

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Thank you yet again Swannie! I hadn't seen that interview before. I was crying listening to Gerry. He has had a life that is so full of experiences. As a mom, I thought of Gerry's mom & how she had to watch her son go through those parts of his life. We try to support our children with love but ultimately, they must live their own life. Gerry is a better man for having gone through the rough times but perservering & coming out stronger. You can see this in his performances. He is such a philosophical & caring man. May life continue to bless him & support what challenges may come his way. I hope he knows how much we love & support him!

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Sometimes I doubt myself, you know? Sometimes I think... maybe I've gone 'round the bend over this guy, and see qualities in him that aren't really there. I mean, I have pretty much had a few people tell me that. LOL

People have told me that I read into him what I WANT to see, but that none of us can know who he really is. You know what? I'm tired of hearing that, and this new (to me) video has really given me a boost of confidence in my own instinctive understanding of this man.

Of course how we view him as fans does not at all limit him to just what we see.... I am sure there are facets to him, only those closest in his life are aware of, but from interviews like this one.... wow, he can take your breath away with his insightful intelligence.

What he said regarding films like the Phantom really changing a person's view about life, struck a giant GONG in my heart. I imagine, before all the craziness of 300 began, Gerry must have poured over the letters and cards sent to him from fans who attested to that.

After 3 years of being Gerry's fan, what is inside him is even more attractive to me than his outward handsomeness.

Swannie

Edited by Swansong

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:wave: Hi All,

GB distancing himself??? I truly believe he is not one who would ever distance himself from those who helped get him where he is BUT, after some of the comments from fans about other fans pulling him away from his work when he was filming "Butterfly" to me, logically, will cause OTHERS to FORCE him to limit his time---for safety as much as anythig else. As his fame has increased--so has his fan base which will include MANY who are not very considerate and are more on the "demanding" side of fan life than the "appreciative and polite" side as most of those on this site are. There will always be the few who ruin things for the many as well as his own handlers who will restrict him from being torn apart by crowds of paparazzi and autograph seekers--unfortunately taking away time from true,respectful fans. This is the real beginning of fame for him since "300". I think his true value and versatility as an outstanding actor will be sealed for newbie fans with "P.S. I Love You" and the legions of new fans will grow exponentially! I think his ability to keep long time friends throughout his life indicates his true nature--honesty, loyalty and genuine in his relating with people. The directness of his focus on fans and looking people straight in the eyes has been described many times in encounters. He, I believe, would not be able to give all he would want to equally for fans when there are SOOO many more than the intimate numbers there were in years past. Hence, not wanting to slight anyone combined with restrictions by handlers--let alone any safety concerns ---will logically lead to his having less time for us. He has NOT ever been visibly involved in his websites from what I have read over the last few years. He HAS read and checked on things from time to time, is kept aware of sites and fans but we need to remember he is only human and a very busy one at that. If it comes down to reading more fan encounters or his safety--I choose his safety and hopefully lots more photos of him out and about--unintrusive ones of course!! :D

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After 3 years of being Gerry's fan, what is inside him is even more attractive to me than his outward handsomeness.

Swannie

The outward handsomeness may have been what initially grabbed some of us *points to self* but the inside part that we've gotten to see thru interviews and such is what has kept us around. Or at least that's true in my own case.

And that part of it will not change for me if I don't ever get to see him in person. It's been fun the last couple of years enjoying what felt like a little secret. But he clearly has other roles inside of him that I'm looking forward to seeing. I liked what you said earlier, Swannie, about how he seems to surrender to his characters. That's part of what keeps me interested. It's not GERARD BUTLER in flashing neon lights playing the role. It's his vision of his various characters that we see up on the screen. There are other actors that do that and I admire them greatly. Others seem to always be *insert actor's name* up on the screen reading lines. They don't "become" their characters. They may have greater name recognition but that doesn't make them better actors.

I just read what you wrote, Timeless Jewel. Well said. :clap: :clap: :clap:

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Swannie,

I wanted to direct this first paragraph to you alone.

Don't ever doubt that instinctive quality that you have m'lady. To be able to write with the passion that you do takes a great deal or forethought and a solidity of character in order to express the feelings that come from the depths of your soul. I for one have been truly struck to my core at the way you so eloquently place into words what I'm more than sure most of us here in the fan based community wish we could convey. Don't take that beautiful gift you have away from us. I'm probably going to sound rather strange when I admit this but I'm willing to take that risk as long as it gets through to you. You've saved my sanity. There's been many a day here lately that I've found an odd solace in the words you've placed here and it's helped me be able to cope with the pressures of everyday life. I can be completely spooled at work, ready to rip people apart and then I come here and read some random thought you've written or some random piece of poetry and it helps defuse that wick that was so ready to explode only moments before. I for one have to thank you and will end this portion by asking that you never stop allowing us access to that talent.

Now that I've managed to make myself look like an obsessed fan with huge anger issues....I'll get to the other point *L*

I'd have to say I agree. With all the craziness surrounding both POTO and 300, Gerard has still managed to stay grounded and as connected as he can to his fans. It is my belief that in order to play the roles he's been given so convincingly, he's had to have gone through many of the trails and tribulations and as a result poured that experience into those roles.

The fact remains, He is a mortal man with the same insecurities, loves, losses and drives that all of us here have. He has yet to be effected by the overwhelming success, and he has yet to let it all go to his head. I have a gut feeling, something that tells me from deep within my chest that in a way Gerard feels like he owes us, so in his own way he gives back to us as much as he can.

I'm sure he has good and bad days. He's of flesh and bone. I'm sure he gets weary, and I'm sure he sometimes wonders what all the fuss is about, but it's that very quality, of humility, that draws the rest of us to him. He's got the swagger, he's got the rugged good looks and in some cases he even has the arrogance that's needed in a business that can chew up and spit out someone of lesser caliber. I think he knows what it is he brings to the table and it's my continued hope that he'll remain as true to himself as he seems to have been and never gets seduced by what the entertainment industry has used to destroy so many young talents like himself.

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This is so interesting. My mom and I have been discussing lately about how we are not hearing much at all from Gerry on a personal basis. Just trailers, pictures, etc. I do think for whatever reason he is distancing himself. From what I've read in his interviews, etc, I think he really does appreciate his fans but I think he also tends to get burned out easily - that boy really knows how to burn the candle - and maybe he just needed a break. Another thought, and this is just a thought, it seemed when he was dating Bianca, you didn't see that many personal sitings, etc. Then when they broke up, he was all over the place, all kinds of nightclubs, parties, and the list goes on. I'm wondering if Gerry is again seeing someone seriously and realizes that he has to give some dedicated time to his significant other so that he doesn't lose someone else in his life. I think he took the break up with Bianca much worse than it appeared. In any case, I hope he finds a good balance as even though so many love and follow Gerry, if they get ignored long enough, they will find someone else to follow - just saying, gals - that can happen. I know, some of us are diehard Gerry under any kind of condition but never say never. Anyway, my thoughts for the day for whatever they are worth.

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Guest DonnaKat

In any case, I hope he finds a good balance as even though so many love and follow Gerry, if they get ignored long enough, they will find someone else to follow - just saying, gals - that can happen. I know, some of us are diehard Gerry under any kind of condition but never say never.

I think the key is to keep things into perspective.

I have a great time on these forums. I've made a lot of good friendships, and I love interacting with people. Through the internet and through venues such as these, I've been able to network, and have even formed a few friendships...not just on "celeb" forums, but from maintaining my own website and generally getting my name out there. :D

Don't get me wrong...it's not that I don't appreciate and admire all the things the actors have done....but it's the friendships I've formed with people such as you that have kept me coming back. I've gone to quite a few conventions and have had the privilege of rubbing elbows with a few of the actors. On an occasion or two, I've met an actor more than once, and have even become a familiar face with a few of them.

BUT...when it all comes down to it, I don't form the bond with them that I do with the "normal" people that frequent these forums, conventions, etc. "Y'all" are the real interesting people, in my book! Through interacting with you, I've met with all sorts of interesting people...people from Denmark, Norway, Canada, England, etc....and the list goes on. I've even met some authors, handlers, agents, etc...not because I was out to do so, but just because we happened to hook up, hit it off as friends, and then I found out what they did for a living.

I guess the point I'm trying to make is...there's nothing wrong with belonging to a "fandom", as long as you don't let it take control of your life. Yes, there are "fandoms" I belong to...but that isn't what defines me as a person. It's only a part of who I am. I have a LOT of different interests, and if one turns sour, I have a lot to fall back on.

I don't know if this is making sense or not, but it's from my heart. For a long time, I would have nothing to do with anything of this nature because I thought it somehow termed me as a "fanatical person". But I've come to realize that EVERYONE is a FAN of SOMETHING. Heck, even celebs are fans of something. So it's okay. The only danger is when one lets that fandom override their senses. *wink*

After all....everyone has to have a diversion, no? :)

Edited by DonnaKat

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DonnaKat,

Very interesting post; thank you for sharing.

I think you have offered even more food for thought on this topic, as your post focuses not on whether Gerry is distancing himself from his fans, but rather, how much distance should we as fans put between ourselves and him, or any other actor's 'fandom' for that matter?

Interesting!

Hugs,

Songbird

~Katie~

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This is an interveiw that I found here: http://www.gerardbutler.moonfruit.com/

I feel it covers a mirad of feelings and thoughts that Gerard has about fame and life in general and will perhaps give a bit of insight into his perspective. I enjoyed reading it and it only solidified further the reasons as to why I will remain a "fan" of the Butler's.

This part in particular for me spoke volumes, and in my opinion, sums it all up very well.

"I have enough experience and foresight to know that my career will never make me happy. It can cover up cracks and give me a lot of fulfilment, but it can never fully fulfil me because a career is not a spiritual thing. I would be scared to think that it could. You have moments of convincing yourself it could because you always base your happiness on some future event - If I get that part, everything will be all right.

Even when I said, If I can only get sober, Ill be happy. No. I got sober, Im much happier, but it didnt make me 100% happy. I used to think if my career took off as an actor, Id be happy. No. It has made me much happier, but not 100% happy." - Gerard Butler -

GERARD BUTLERS father turned up on the doorstep of the family home in Paisley when Butler was four. Cocooned in the self-absorption of early childhood, he was too young to understand the significance of the stranger. So shadowy a figure was the dad of the unexpected visit, so insubstantial, that in future years the actor came to wonder if he had made him up. Perhaps the visit never really happened at all. Perhaps it was just a dream. "I never really asked my mother about it," Butler says now, 30 years later. "But I always wondered, Did I just imagine that? Did he really turn up?"

At 16, he dreamt about his dad. It was definitely a dream this time. In the intervening years his father had been in Canada, but he stole softly back into his sons life through his subconscious. Butlers parents were both Scottish, but his mother had returned from Canada with three children under the age of six when Butler was two. "I went through to my mums bedroom," he recalls, "and I said, Mum, Im never going to see him again, am I? And she said, No, I dont think so. I dont think you are."

Butler didnt need much preparation for his latest role in Dear Frankie. He knew it. He wore it like a pair of comfortable shoes, long ago broken in.

It is the story of a little deaf boy, Frankie, and his mother, played brilliantly by Emily Mortimer. Mortimer is on the run from Frankies violent father, but she creates a fantasy for her son. She tells him the name of a real ship and says his father is a sailor, even writing letters from this imaginary dad and sending them via a post-office box. Frankie (played by Jack McElhone) tracks the ship around the world, but when it docks in the Scottish town where the family is living, he naturally expects a visit. Mortimer needs to find a dad for the day. Enter Butler.

Clearly, the plot is hokum. Apart from anything else, a mother desperate to get a stand-in dad at short notice would inevitably get a man with the girth of a sumo wrestler and the height of Snow Whites dwarves. Instead, a brooding Butler, 6ft 3in and sporting an Elvis leather jacket, lands on her lap. As if. But if the literal truth of Dear Frankie stretches credulity, the emotional truth is utterly convincing. "We were well aware that we had to keep away from schmaltz and being overly sentimental," says Butler.

On the whole, they do. It is beautifully shot, has a terrific cast, and the central relationship, between Frankie and his mother, is moving. One male critic called it a "gobbling, squawking turkey", but then some critics cope better with beheaded soldiers or gangland bloodbaths than they do with more tender emotion. The audience at the Cannes film festival was less macho. The film got a cheering, standing ovation, so unexpected that Butler doubts anything in his career will ever make him feel quite that way again.

But then Butler understands the real emotions behind not having a father. Is that why the role was appealing? "Totally," he agrees. "It was really a cathartic experience. It was one of the easiest jobs I ever did because I so naturally felt I understood the situation that was going on. I really felt the character, and sometimes when you do that you dont want to think too much about it. Every scene was as I both hoped and imagined it would be."

Theres a scene where Frankie has run away, and Butler played it over and over in his head like his own personal movie reel. He knew that scene: where everybody stood, what everybody felt. "Sometimes I can be a pain if a scene doesnt go the way I imagine it to go. I said, They have to be standing here and here and here... I just felt strongly that there was a physical shape to it. I had seen it in my head so many times, where she says, Frankie, this is your dad, and

he looks up. It gets me every time," says Butler, an entire movie beginning to unfold in the expressions on his face. He sounds emotional too, and it becomes hard to know if hes talking about himself or Frankie. Probably both.

"Because its a child, and when you think of yourself in those lovely moments you had as a child, you feel so vulnerable and unprotected. And that little boy didnt ask for that. What has he ever done to anybody? And suddenly hes put in this position of being told, This is your dad. You imagine him looking up and thinking - what is he thinking? And I think about the years when I used to wonder, Where is my dad?"

Dont get him wrong, he says later, calmer. It didnt screw up his entire life, not having a dad. But it taught him stuff. At 15 he had dreamy visions of being in the movies. But then he had what he describes as "an epiphany". "I just thought I should stick in at school and get a really nice professional job and marry a nice woman and have kids." It is doubtful such a dream of stability occurs to a 15-year-old unless there is a good reason.

As a result, Butler studied law at Glasgow University, although he doesnt remember ever actually wanting to be a lawyer. Off campus he played in a band and behaved more like a rock star. He developed a drink problem, like his father before him. Just alcohol? "Mostly alcohol. Some drugs as well. And wildness. A lot of the time I had this craziness, an uncontrollable energy that was, I could stand here, or I could throw myself in front of that car. Sometimes it was an exciting feeling, on the edge." But ultimately destructive? "Self-destructive and self-loathing," he acknowledges. He once jumped from pillar to pillar on the roof of a 46-storey building. And he literally hung, drunk, from the railings of a cruise ship at five in the morning, singing We Are Sailing. They wanted to throw him off next morning.

The trouble was that he had spent years creating a life he didnt actually want to live in. "I was miserable. I used to go home and count the hours until I had to go back to work. I couldnt sleep. When I was 16 I had terrible panic attacks about dying. I had so much to look forward to. At 24 I thought dying might be a relief."

The week before he qualified, he got sacked from his law firm. "I was on warnings and I just... days off and..." He pauses. "I was hardly the kind of person to satisfy rules about codes of conduct and integrity." To get that close and be sacked sounds like deliberate sabotage: I dont want to do this, but I cant say so, so please sack me. "Maybe," he says. "Yeah, absolutely. I was pretending to be this lawyer in a very traditional Edinburgh firm, but I felt like a little Glasgow boy who was totally at sea and could barely scramble a meal, let alone deal with clients and do complicated legal work."

But through all the misery, he felt "guided" by a higher power. He was being allowed to mess things up so he could take another route. "I once heard a guy say that you couldnt have any regrets until the day you die, because only then does everything fit into place. The day I was fired was the worst day of my life, but now I think, If that hadnt happened where would I be? Would I be alive?"

The day after being sacked, he left for London to begin his acting career, starting with a bit part in Coriolanus. "I was sitting with nothing after all those years of studying, so why not aim for the stars?" Was his mother mad at him? "Mad," he repeats immediately. "But I think more sad. I think she got to the stage where she just didnt know what to do. Ill never forget a letter she sent me when I went to London. I know how hard it was for her to write it. She just said, Whatever you do in life, I dont care so long as you are happy. We have always had quite a tempestuous relationship. She can drive me crazy and I know that I have driven her absolutely crazy, and still can. But I wouldnt be here if it wasnt for her, and I wouldnt be what I am if it wasnt for her."

Butler no longer drinks. But he has an addictive personality - he smokes 60 cigarettes a day, and the day after the interview has an appointment to start his 26th attempt at kicking the habit. Acting, too, has become an addiction. "I have a very addictive nature, and unfortunately I have become addicted to my work. I love acting - and thats great - but it doesnt quite solve the problem."

As an actor, you are surrounded by people. But its often new people, on each new set. Relationships are difficult to sustain. Butler has a friend who is just like him. They cry at romantic movies and have big romantic ideals. But they are rubbish at the real thing. "Im sure there will be a few ex-girlfriends reading this thinking, Aye, youre fking right there, mate," laughs Butler. But hed like to be a father one day. "There are certain moments when you think, God, wouldnt it be great to have a little kid."

When he hears the word father, what does it make him feel? He exhales slowly, deeply, like hes gently releasing his thoughts on the breath. There is a long pause. "I dont... I dont even... I have a sense of father, but I dont know if I can put it into words. You almost want to start describing the functions of a father, but I never really, in terms of an actual father, had one. I have a fantastic stepfather, but in terms of an actual father I wouldnt really know. The word father makes me feel something. It makes me feel something, but I dont know... I think almost... heartache," he says, and his voice lilts upwards, as if in a question.

FIVE weeks after dreaming of his father, 16-year-old Butler came home to find his mothers boyfriend, later his stepdad, waiting. "Keep your jacket on," he was told, "your fathers here." They met in a restaurant, Butler walking past tables of strangers and wondering which face he should know every curve and line of. "I was literally going, Which one of these guys is my dad?"

Words seemed inadequate. "I thought, What do you say? This is my fking father in front of me. Until I sat down, and then I said, Why didnt you get in touch?" Butler cried then, hours of tears for years of absence. "I couldnt stop. I could barely speak. I always remember that, and thinking, Where did that come from? I didnt know it was in there until those words came out: Why didnt you get in touch? It was such a mixture of pain and anger, but relief and joy and just complete... surprise. I cant think of a better word than surprise." He laughs. "Oh hello, theres my dad!"

It was the start of a special relationship, but the possibility of having a father had gone. "It was like having a friend, a very crazy one." His father owned a shop selling novelty umbrellas and hats. "My dad was nuts. He was a very entertaining man, the best story-teller, the best joke-teller, like a big kid. I realised I had a lot of anger in me about not having spent my childhood with him, but when I met him and got to know him I realised he was just trying his best, the way he knew how. He was quite an irresponsible man, but I dont think he had a lot of evil in him. He was very childish in a way, but a good man. I am really glad I got to know him."

Prone to mishaps, though. He went to Africa to buy gold but got conned with copper and he ended up in hospital with malaria. Butler was supposed to rescue him, but then his fathers French-Canadian second wife said she would go. "I weel go," says Butler, adopting a French accent. "I am French and nobodee weel make a fool of me..." She broke her leg and ended up in the bed next to her husband. "Now the two of them are in fking Togoland with 70,000 worth of copper, and a massive fall-out with his business partner, who abandoned him. They eventually made it back home, even more broke than before."

When Butler was about 23, his father developed cancer. "He told me he was dying, and basically said. Lets go on a Caribbean cruise." Later, Butler spent the final few weeks of his fathers life at home with him in Canada. "I am especially glad I could be there in his last moments," he says. "I felt his fear in the end, and I could really see how important it was to him that I was there. He was pretty much in a coma, waking up only for minutes at a time, and when he woke up he knew he was dying. He wanted to hold our hands, and he would say, I am so glad you are here. Then I was glad I was there."

He gained so much respect for his father in those last weeks. Before he began losing consciousness, his father had laughed and joked. "I loved his swan song, that he went out with such a brave face. I hope I could be as brave as him if the same thing happened to me, to keep such humour."

His father never lived to see his sons acting career. Butler starred opposite Angelina Jolie in Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life, which is success in anybodys book. But right now is an interesting time for him. Hes on the cusp of the super league, having won the lead role in the film version of Phantom of the Opera, which will be released in December. The role was both physically and emotionally exhausting. "The Phantom descends into madness, heartache, loss and tragedy. Towards the end, when you see my deformity, I was getting up at 3.30 in the morning and going in for five or six hours of prosthetics. Then I was crying my eyes out and screaming and shouting, and finally getting to bed at ten at night so wound up that I couldnt sleep."

And the result? "I havent seen the whole thing, but I know I did the best I could. Im more excited about this than any movie Ive ever done. I think everybody involved is hugely, quietly confident. I saw a ten-minute preview and it makes my spine tingle, and I cant stop myself from crying."

Is it frightening that the role could be life-changing? "Frightening and exciting." But he already knows acting is not everything. "I have enough experience and foresight to know that my career will never make me happy. It can cover up cracks and give me a lot of fulfilment, but it can never fully fulfil me because a career is not a spiritual thing. I would be scared to think that it could. You have moments of convincing yourself it could because you always base your happiness on some future event - If I get that part, everything will be all right.

"Even when I said, If I can only get sober, Ill be happy. No. I got sober, Im much happier, but it didnt make me 100% happy. I used to think if my career took off as an actor, Id be happy. No. It has made me much happier, but not 100% happy."

He says he is much happier than he once was, but you do sense the circle is not quite complete. At the end of Dear Frankie there is the possibility of a future relationship for Butler, Mortimer and the child. Is that what is missing for Butler? "If I were to fall in love and have a wonderful relationship and a family, I could imagine saying, Wow, this is what its all about. But how many people have that? But if you could say it would be a relationship that was good..." He laughs. "And the film would go mega. And my family would live forever. Then Id be happy!"

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Thank you for sharing that, Iliesa. It's been a long time since I'd seen that one.

Gerry does seem to really get inside himself and share his thoughts, his doubts and fears, and his success, with his audience/readers/fans.

:rose:

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Thanks Ili! I needed that. Reading stuff like this just makes me love him more.

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*sigh* I love Gerry......sorry I know that isn't really adding anything to the conversation, but I just really love this guy. And before someone jumps in to tell me I am crazy, I don't mean love like I love my hubby or kids.....I mean love in a totally admiring, respecting kinda way.

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*sigh* I love Gerry......sorry I know that isn't really adding anything to the conversation, but I just really love this guy. And before someone jumps in to tell me I am crazy, I don't mean love like I love my hubby or kids.....I mean love in a totally admiring, respecting kinda way.

Don't worry.... on this site, no one jumps us for saying that we love Gerry! :wave:

Swannie

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*sigh* I love Gerry......sorry I know that isn't really adding anything to the conversation, but I just really love this guy. And before someone jumps in to tell me I am crazy, I don't mean love like I love my hubby or kids.....I mean love in a totally admiring, respecting kinda way.

Don't worry.... on this site, no one jumps us for saying that we love Gerry! :wave:

Swannie

Yep. You are definitely amongst those who understand exactly what you mean.

:igotgals:

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I could not agree more, Mel.... your words are profound.

What artists like Gerry do, is so much more than entertain us.

I remember when I was in about the third grade, and my parents took me to see The Sound Of Music for the first time. That film had such a profound impact on my life, that even months after seeing it, I listened to my Sound of Music soundtrack, and sang with every single song. I had vivid dreams about that movie, and it was during that time, I discovered I could actually sing. I'll never forget the "Maria" costume my mother made for me. It was identical to the one worn by Julie Andrews as the novice nun. I wore that costume when I sung the title song for a our school's talent show.... my first ever public performance.

I liken my experience in watching POTO with my reaction to The Sound of Music. Both movies were life affirming and life changing for me, and both movies delivered a message I needed to hear.

I am reminded of Gerry's own experience with the movie Krull. He loves to tell the story about how he fell in love with the princess and even had vivid dreams that he was the hero in the movie, and she was his beautiful bride. He says seeing that movie made him realize he wanted more than anything, to be an actor.

At their best, movies are art, and NOT just another form of entertainment. Actors at their best, are artists, whose performances have the power to move us in profound ways. I believe REAL actors like Gerry, will always know that the story is more important than they are, and that is why you do not sense the man's own ego in his roles. He surrenders to his characters, because he know they have a story to tell.

I think most of us can tell the difference between a Star, and an actor, an artist.... and Gerry is indeed a true artist, capable of projecting our fears, longings and life experiences right through that screen.

The amazing thing is, while many of us discovered him through Phantom, and were so deeply moved by that film.... other fans have had equally profound and moving reactions to his other roles. So I think we can be certain, it's not just the Phantom, where Gerry gave something special to the role. He does this in many of his films, because he is an artist who is after more than fame and recognition.

I'll bet many of you can name movies, books or even paintings that touched you in some special fashion. I'll bet you even remember the theater where you saw the film. Art in all its forms is the language of the soul.... and Gerard James Butler speaks that language to our hearts.

No wonder he loves what he does!

Swannie

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Mrs C. Don't worry about loving Gerry on this site doll! We all fully understand!

:ohbaby2: <--- Think we all take a collective sigh when we see things like this. *L*

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