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10/7 - Gerard Butler Turns The Camera On Photographers At Premiere - Pictures


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from: http://www.entertainmentwise.com/news/5015...miere--pictures

Wednesday 07th Oct 2009

Gerard Butler gave photographers a taste of their own medicine when he turned one of their own cameras on them last night.

The japery went down at the premiere of the Scottish hunk's new movie, Law Abiding Citizen, at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood.

As a high-spirited Butler walked the red carpet, he grabbed a shutterbug's hardware and trained the lens on the row of paparazzi snapping his picture. Say cheese!

with pictures read article: here

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I'm liking that suit! *sigh*

Versace, nice - I am surprised some designer has not snapped him up to do a print ad campaign. What I like about P. Diddy is that he uses very macho looking models for his Sean Jean line at the runway shows - P Diddy is smart - he knows to whom he is marketing his clothes.

So what size were those feet anyway, bwah.

Edited by lavender1960
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I'm liking that suit! *sigh*

Versace, nice - I am surprised some designer has not snapped him up to do a print ad campaign. What I like about P. Diddy is that he uses very macho looking models for his Sean Jean line at the runway shows - P Diddy is smart - he knows to whom he is marketing his clothes.

So what size were those feet anyway, bwah.

Size 11, pretty ordinary for a man of 6'2". He is so perfectly

proportioned that it is unbelievable.

So GORGEOUS. Head to toe. He has the prettiest feet.

Love him absolutely,

Sandy

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Taking the camera from a photographer? So cute. Did he actually snap any pictures? I'd be excited to see them.

I hated how the article had to throw in something about Jennifer Aniston though. Why can't they just give it up? Doesn't it strike them as odd that they haven't been around together since The Bounty filming wrapped?

Yes yes, beautiful man! I don't think the designer of the suit makes any difference in how gorgeous he looks though. Plus, you know we go just as crazy when we see him walking down the street in his grey t-shirt, jeans and sketchers. :)

Steph

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Very classy! I love a man in a suit, especially Gerry!

My dad would be very impressed with the camera Gerry borrowed...

Sally

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is the picture only in the newspaper edition, I don't see any picture at the website

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/entertainment...86908-21731431/

love this excerpt from a report on the premiere, basically author loved GB

There is one photographer who has the biggest Nikon lens on her camera that Butler noticed. He was amused that it was so big. He came up to her and took her camera to take shots of the photographers on the line. All the photogs "oohed" and "ahhed" as Butler gave her camera back and gave her a big hug. This time the photographer was the subject in the picture along with Butler.

Butler loves to joke around also, as one female photog tried to get his attention with the line "Me love you long time!" Gerry started to laugh and restate that line adding, "That's a good one."

Whole Article

Edited by lavender1960
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Good for him! Turn the tables on the paps! He does look nice! Very healthy! So handsome in a suit though I prefer him in jeans & a t-shirt.

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Always good to see a bloke scrub up for an event.

Looking at the coverage, the media were loving the photos of Gerry and the big lens. :wuv: Many were using one of those pictures as their lead photo. Clever boy.

I noted a interesting twitter as well - someone said, watching the trailers I don't get how GB's character is the villain. And that I think is another bonus for the film because a lot of people ARE frustrated with the criminal justice system and may not see GB's character as a villain- ref. Roman Polanski, ehem.

I just read about a case in my hometown, where a guy who was pissed off at a coworker, they had an affair with, both were married, she broke it off and he put a toxic substance at her work station because he wanted her to quit. She had all these medical problems and finally figured out the work place was the problem, her employers set up video surveillance on her work area and caught this guy administering this substance to her keyboard, her chair, her desk. He got off an conditional sentence and probation????? Sorry you start messing with chemicals you need to do jail time.

Edited by lavender1960
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I really liked Gerry's comments about the criminal justice system during the fansite telephone interview. He noted that there were both negatives AND positives to the system of plea bargaining that we have set up in our country. I think a lot of people hear the outrageous stories where the system just lets people off when it shouldn't and assume it's all a bad idea. I have a criminology degree, and I've done a lot of research in this area. Most people who work in the system generally think it's a positive. Most people don't understand that with the extremely limited resources, it simply wouldn't be possible for every criminal defendant to go to trial.

Here's another thing to think about: one of the goals of incarceration as a punishment is deterrence (along with rehabilitation, incapacitation, and retribution). Research has shown that prison (as well as the death penalty) are generally NOT a deterrent to criminals, and one of the reasons is that for a punishment to act as a deterrent, it needs to be 1) swift, 2) assured, and 3) final. The trial process is completely the opposite of those three requirements. It often takes years to complete, the outcome is certainly not assured, and it isn't final as even if the defendant is convicted he usually has one or more appeals. Plea bargaining is much quicker, the sentence is known ahead of time to all parties, and it's (more or less) final.

There has been legislation pushed through in some states that limit the ability of prosecutors to plea bargain in certain cases, and although it has good intentions it doesn't work out well in practice. Plus, many prosecutors get around a prohibition on traditional plea bargaining (sentence reduction) by agreeing to charge the criminal with a lesser offense if they agree to plead guilty (charge reduction). That ends up being even worse, because it can be psychologically detrimental to the victims. Can you imagine if you were raped, and because of prosecutorial bargaining legislation the charge was pled down to sexual misconduct? Essentially it'd be the government saying that you weren't raped at all!

Anyway, to sum up my rant, the CJS is remarkably complex. Plea bargaining may not be ideal, but it's the system that we've evolved to deal with our short-comings. Any change is going to require years and years of evolution, and there's no guarantee it'll be any better.

Steph

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Quite true AT.

Plea bargaining should be a delicate balancing act of all the players, the victim, the accused, and society and I think they get it right more than wrong most of the time or at least the outcomes are acceptable to the players. In certain kinds of cases it is in the best interest of the victim to avoid a trial. I do think that the perception, rightly or wrongly, is that the victims too often get lost in the gamemanship.

I can't wait to see this movie because I would like to know if the DA or the police dropped the ball. That does happen and that is one of the instances where you get upset. In other words if they had done their job properly in the initial investigation would they have needed to plea bargain or could they have bargained for a sentence that seemed more appropriate under the circumstances.

I know of two high profile cases where a plea bargain was made before all the facts and evidence were in and justice was not served at all. Karla Homolka is the one case that upsets Canadians most of all. She served her full 12 year term but she should be in for life like her ex husband, Paul Bernardo. The woman is a pyschopath in my opinion and I shudder to think she is out there free and spawning apparently, with some biker boyfriend she met in jail.

I would agree that simply warehousing people in prisons doesn't serve the public good either. For those who are not chronic dangerous offenders, you need to be putting back a better person on the street than came into that prison for the greater good of society but that is not what is happening in a large number of cases. [Oz was one of my favourite TV shows, a good representation of life in prison, it is just the mean streets moved into a concrete building].

Edited by lavender1960
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Quite true AT.

Plea bargaining should be a delicate balancing act of all the players, the victim, the accused, and society and I think they get it right more than wrong most of the time or at least the outcomes are acceptable to the players. In certain kinds of cases it is in the best interest of the victim to avoid a trial. I do think that the perception, rightly or wrongly, is that the victims too often get lost in the gamemanship.

I can't wait to see this movie because I would like to know if the DA or the police dropped the ball. That does happen and that is one of the instances where you get upset. In other words if they had done their job properly in the initial investigation would they have needed to plea bargain or could they have bargained for a sentence that seemed more appropriate under the circumstances.

I know of two high profile cases where a plea bargain was made before all the facts and evidence were in and justice was not served at all. Karla Homolka is the one case that upsets Canadians most of all. She served her full 12 year term but she should be in for life like her ex husband, Paul Bernardo. The woman is a pyschopath in my opinion and I shudder to think she is out there free and spawning apparently, with some biker boyfriend she met in jail.

I would agree that simply warehousing people in prisons doesn't serve the public good either. For those who are not chronic dangerous offenders, you need to be putting back a better person on the street than came into that prison for the greater good of society but that is not what is happening in a large number of cases. [Oz was one of my favourite TV shows, a good representation of life in prison, it is just the mean streets moved into a concrete building].

I'm going to be fascinated watching LAC as well, since I'm so into the CJS and stuff. That is a major criticism that I have about the CJS though, it's not nearly as victim-friendly as it should be. I mean, criminal prosecutions are technically the people of the state versus the defendant (or the people of the United States, depending on the jurisdiction), not the victim versus the defendant, so it makes sense that they don't have decision-making power, but there are times when there's little to no communication with the victims or their families at all.

And the problems with the prison system are too huge for me to even ponder... it's just all so screwed up, it's hard to imagine it could ever get fixed. First thing though is that there are WAY too many people in prison. I believe it's largely due to the "war on drugs." Most people incarcerated in America are there for drug offenses. Do we really need to house these people in prison in order to "protect" society? I believe that we need to transition from viewing drug addiction as a legal problem to a mental health problem, and send them to treatment clinics rather than prisons. Also, there are some creative alternative sentencing options being explored by judges, so perhaps that has some potential. It's funny to think that the whole notion of prison as punishment is only a few hundred years old. Prior to the 1700s, prisons didn't exist, and jails were simply where you held people until trial. It always makes me laugh when I watch 300 and Theron is threatening Gorgo, and says that if Leonidas returns to Sparta "he will go to jail or worse." Jail? Hah! There was no jail back then! :)

Anyway, I've gone on far too long I think.

Steph

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I'll just add, were there no jails because you were hanged for simple offences like stealing a loaf of bread? Certainly a death penalty for all offences makes it simple huh if not rather draconian.

Well, they did use the death penalty more in the past, but the lack of prisons was really just because nobody had really thought of the idea that housing people away could be a punishment in itself. Lots of early punishments were demonstrative... you'd be branded or have certain body parts cut off. That way, anyone you encountered could see on your body what crimes you had committed. In America, it was the Quakers who came up with the idea of prisons, by creating places where criminals would be housed and forced to basically sit and think about what they had done (be penitent... hence the name penitentiary).

Anyway, that's probably enough of a Criminology lesson. We've officially strayed way too far from the thread topic. :kisswink:

Steph

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