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11/6 - Scots star Gerard Butler ready for homecoming premiere - and hitting 40


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Its such a shame Susan they did not release the film sooner and the premiere could have been held when all his fans were there for the Convention. So glad you had a great time and that jetlag will be around for a while :lmao:

Moira

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Thanks Moira for posting this wonderfull article.

Glad he's having fun- Little parties are the best anyway-

Glad he will be Home for his big birthday to. Always good to be around family on a milestone.

Best Wishes and a very Happy Birthday to Gerry!

Annemarie

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Thanks Moria Love the Article I'd be glad to have a "small" party with him LOL I'm sure we all would. Have a great time and hope you get tix for premiere!

:kiss:

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This article brought me to tears. It is hard to imagine the sacrifices Gerry has to make for the

sake of his career, to be at maximum demand, and bankable in the eyes of the PTB. Way too

much about $$, and there are so many "rules" that go along with being in the spotlight--every

teeny tiny thing is under constant strutiny. BUT, this artlcle just proves once again, that Gerry

is still the same wonderful, thoughtful, caring and loving man we know him to be. THAT IS WHY

WE LOVE HIM SO. May his birthday celebrations be as wonderful as he deserves!

Judy

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I do agree with Abandon Thought, there are some roles where he can get away with the Scottish accent but getting the American accent down will improve his chances of getting other roles in Hollywood, it is as simply as that. You are really at the mercy of the director's vision. Just living in the US tends to water down the accents of a lot of actors. An ability to do different accents is part of the actor's arsenal of tricks and actors that can excel in that ability have more options and opportunities to them if you want to work in the wider cinema. And the accent like the physical can actually aid you in developing the character. Gary Oldman is another one of my favourite actors, and he is a whiz at the accents. After all he had to unlearn his own natural accent at drama school. I love his small role in the film True Romance where he plays a white pimp that thinks he is black. He developed the accent first and the rest of the character flowed from there.

There are some roles where you have to be authentic or the movie won't work. Kevin Costner with his horrible English accent in Robin Hood? Sorry Robin is English, American accent does not cut it. Even more cringeworthy when you have to see Costner in the same movie as the great Alan Rickman. Keanu Reeves and Winona Ryder in Bram Stoker's Dracula, I cringe every time they came on the screen.

I've noticed that Gerry speaks lower when he does the American accent and I have to say I find that hot.

I can't wait for the Canadian accent, eh? He's be natural for a Newfoundland brogue. We need a good movie about sexy hockey players.

Edited by lavender1960
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A party with his niece? That is the cutest thing EVER :)

And he'll finally have an excuse not to hide when he eats cake :)

What is that? Like FOUR parties :thud:

I'm glad he is going to be enjoying himself.

I'm sure when he was going crazy drinking he never thought he'd make it to 40 and now look at him.

So successful and so grateful :)

Awesome article, thanks for posting.

I have a friend who basically celebrates her birthday for one week every year, not just milestones like the big 4-0, because she usually is celebrating with her family and different groups of friends and workmates every night for about a week and so she calls it Staceyfest. So really then this is Gerardfest or Gerryfest. The diet always begins again the day after Birthdayfest.

Edited by lavender1960
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Great article ,thanks for posting!

Awww celebrating his birthday with his niece, that's just too cute! :wuv:

I usually have like 4 or 5 birthday parties, starting in June and sometimes going on until September. Celebrating with different groups of friends, workmates. Going out to dinner, drinks. I like that better than one big birthday party where everyone is having a great time eating and drinking and I'm running around all evening, making sure everyone is having a good time. :p

I'm glad he gets to spend his birthday with his family. He needs a lot of TLC. And sleep!

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I've noticed that Gerry speaks lower when he does the American accent and I have to say I find that hot.

I can't wait for the Canadian accent, eh? He's be natural for a Newfoundland brogue. We need a good movie about sexy hockey players.

I noticed he speaks in a deeper voice as well when he’s doing the American accent. This is a contrast with some British actors, (not Oldman or Tim Roth) who seem to speak in a higher nasal voice when attempting an American accent. I think he hit on a solid American accent for LAC. While there were some lilting inflections from time to time, it wasn’t pronounced and his diction was crisp and clear. If I just heard that accent and had no idea of Gerry’s background I would assume he was American. I’ve noticed that Sit Anthony Hopkins simply modulates his accent in subtle degrees depending on the role he’s playing, and it works very well for him. I think that’s what Gerry is starting to do.

Never fear I don’t think Gerry will ever lose his Scottish accent no mater how much time he spends here, it’s an integral part of who he is.

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I can't wait for the Canadian accent, eh? He's be natural for a Newfoundland brogue. We need a good movie about sexy hockey players.

LOL I have to agree Lavender. We know that he did spend some time in Toronto as a teen so he's slightly familiar with Canada at least ;)

Amanda

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America has it's own culture, which is a blend of the many other people that settled here to make it what it is today. In my travels I've often heard people say that we have no culture, but in many of the places that I've been they've taken on a lot of the culture, and sub culture of the USA.

No matter what accent he uses, what movies he does, or where he lives the dude will always be Scottish. Period. No matter where I go, live, hang out or whatever I'm always going to be an American. When I studied German, I spoke it with an American accent (better than most, but def not like a native).

I find it interesting that anyone in the states gives him sh*it about his accent, as most of the people I know, and the regions that I've been in love foreign accents, especially anywhere on the British Aisles. Of course if you haven't traveled people tend to think you're from England. I'm pretty good with English and Irish, sometimes Scottis, but I couldn't tell a Welsh accent if it came up and kicked me in the face!

My mother has been a speech pathologist for over forty years, and I asked her about accents and people losing their accents. She told me that once you finish your secondary education it is very rare that you will loose your accent. It can be done, but it takes a lot of effort. So that's why you'll have children that are from another country speaking with none of their original accent and their parents may have the same thick accent. Of course human nature is to acclimate to your surroundings. When I'm in Europe I ask for a lift or a toilet. When I'm at home in the US, unless I want someone to take me somewhere in their car, I ask for an elevator and then where are the bath/restrooms are located. There are slight differences between speaking American, and speaking English, LOL. Or atleast the Brits do love to tell us that, LOL.

The thing that always gets me is the football, LOL. It makes me laugh how crazy people get when you say soccer, LOL. If you want to get someone all worked up, and get a twenty minute lecture on why America is evil call football, soccer! LOL.

Of course Scottish people aren't much different from regions of America. I'd love to live in Germany, London or Dublin. Now when I tell people in the midwest and the South these things they get really defensive. They want to know what's wrong with America. Am I trying to be unAmerican. You know crazy sh*t like that. Then again you have to consider the source, so I usually don't give it a lot of thought. One thing I've learned through all my travels is that I'm an American girl through and through. I don't do shared bathrooms unless Iknow you. It totally freaks me out, LOL. I do eat the foods of the countries that I'm in , but I'm not above stopping into McDonald's, KFC, or Pizza Hut when I want the familiar feeling of home.

Why is everyone so hopped up for Gerry to get married? Everything happens in it's own time. Things tend to happen when you least expect them. I'm sure he'll find the right woman to settle down with, and he'll eventually have children. Right now, he's enjoying the beauty of the world. The world is big, and their are a lot of beautiful people in it. Got to love the Bday parties! I'd so love for Jamie Foxx to plan a bday party for Gerry. Now that would be the party of the century, LOL!

Sorry so long,

D

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Having spent some time in Australia, I picked up the term grid iron football which is what they call North American, NFL-CFL style football because they have soccer aka football, rugby and Aussie rules football aka footy. I like that, grid iron football, sounds very macho however they don't understand the helmet and the padding, think it is a bit sissy.

If one is fortunate enough to travel, you pick up words from all those places and after all that is how English became the rich language that is, picking up words from here and there and the constant reinventing of old words and making up new words. And you don't even have to travel to places. I picked up Crikey from the Crocodile Dundee movies and I pick up words from movies and TV all the time. I picked up the phrase parental unit from The Coneheads on Saturday Night Live. I just love words I guess. Words and accents.

I suspect or I hope that Gerry was being a bit tongue in cheek/sarcastic about some of that. A few weeks in the homeland and the accent should be back up to speed anyhoo.

Edited by lavender1960
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Moira...thanks for sharing the article. I echo the comments of everyone here...this article is the best recent article/interview with GJB I've read by far. From the relaxed manner of speech he is using it could be that he is familiar with John Dingwall and that gave him an increased sense of calm and trust during the interview. A lovely article in any case.

Though I, too, love and much prefer his thicker Scottish accent, it's important to remember that when you sign on for a film role, such as in The Ugly Truth, you agree to what's presented to you and it's the artist/author/producer/screenwriter/director that you take direction from. If that calls for an "American" accent, that's what you do. Gerry knows better than anyone what he's doing and his decisions haven't hurt him much so far, right? I know I'm just fine with every little word that comes tripping across those looovely lips.

I can't imagine that 99% of Scotland doesn't love him unconditionally. Those there that don't, well you just can't please everyone, right? His connections around the world in the film arts have put Scotland on the map in many respects, and in a big way. Bravo! Well done, Gerard!

Thanks for sharing this wonderful bit of a glimpse into Gerry's world! He's a gem.

Leslie

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I think we all understand that Gerry has to do what he has to do for his job, and I would never tell him to be a diva or anything and not do what is needed to get work. I know for me I just adore the brogue and want to hear it more often.

Also, that movies don't represent the true America, that's all I meant. :)

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Thanks for sharing. I find it hilarious that he doesn't want to share his birthday. I'm exactly the same way. When Disney started their promotion to celebrate your birthday there and be admitted into the parks for free my sister went for her birthday. She talked about how everywhere she went there was someone wearing a button that said today's my birthday. I said there is no way I would be happy to meet lots of people who share the same birthday!! Ha ha!

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America has it's own culture, which is a blend of the many other people that settled here to make it what it is today. In my travels I've often heard people say that we have no culture, but in many of the places that I've been they've taken on a lot of the culture, and sub culture of the USA.

I often feel like a person without a homeland. I was born in the US and have lived here my whole life, but I've never really thought of myself as an American. I mean, I know I am, (because what else would I be?) but I've never really felt a connection to an American culture (oxymoron? Even if we were unified in that way I'd hesitate to call what we contribute to the world "culture"), or taken pride in being an American. I feel very out of place here.

That's why I am so impressed by how fiercely Scottish Gerry is. He obviously has more than a respect for his culture, more than a love... It's like Scotland is part of him, and he carries it wherever he goes. I bet he finds it laughable that people could accuse him of turning his back on his Scottish heritage.

I thought this article did a great job of communicating that which those of us who pay attention already knew: Gerry is a Scot, through and through.

Steph

Edited by AbandonThought
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He is so right about the accent though. We Scots guard our heritage and countrymen fiercely. We don't want anything to take it away from us. We have fought for hundreds of years for the right and refuse to give it up LOL. It's a clan thing where we protect our own :)

I was born and bred in Glasgow and I will always consider Scotland my home, but that is not to say that I don't love living here. When I first came over I talked at ninety miles an hour and chopped off the end of my words. I got so tired of having to repeat myself I had to learn to slow down and enunciate.

People say you don't have much of a Scottish accent. Well, don't put me in a room with other Scots and don't get me ticked off LOL. That's when the passionate brogue comes out....... big time.

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Thanks Moira for sharing this wonderful article with us. I hope Gerry receives the respect and support at the LAC premier he so deserves. Good to hear he is off home to visit the family and to celebrate not only his birthday but his niece's too! Look forward to seeing the photos and reading all about the premier.

Sal

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I can't wait for the Canadian accent, eh? He's be natural for a Newfoundland brogue. We need a good movie about sexy hockey players.

OMG, I swear I got goosebumps when I read that, that would be so sexy, Gerry as a hockey player, that's two fantasies in one! :-) I think hockey players with all their gear look as the most masculine, sexiest athletes. When they skate into the rink at the beginning of a game, my heart skips a bit or two (as you can tell, my Canadian husband has done some great work with me :-) ).

Anyway, I was thinking Slide could be about an ex hockey player instead of a baseball player. Gerry certainly has the physique for it and hockey uniforms are so much sexier than the baseball one. :-)

Theresa

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Just an FYI...it was Gerry who wanted to do an American accent in TUT. He was originally going to be Scottish but he decided that Mike should be an American.

:wuv:

Now that you say that I do remember him saying that. However, I wonder why and what his motivation was. Maybe he said it in the article; I'll have to find it.

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He felt Mike was essentially an American character. I think he's right. As somebody said above about LAC, otherwise he just becomes an obnoxious 'foreigner' and the plot gets skewed. :D I know "Mikes", unfortunately not with G's underlying charm and appeal. LOL

Jane

Edited by Jeb
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I often feel like a person without a homeland. I was born in the US and have lived here my whole life, but I've never really thought of myself as an American. I mean, I know I am, (because what else would I be?) but I've never really felt a connection to an American culture (oxymoron? Even if we were unified in that way I'd hesitate to call what we contribute to the world "culture"), or taken pride in being an American. I feel very out of place here.

Steph, I want you to know that you're not alone. I'm only third generation American and so I've never felt that die-hard patriotism either. There are many advantages to being an American, but those to me are mostly political in nature. Anyway, this could take an ugly turn, but since you publicly admitted this, I wanted to publicly tell you that you're not alone. :)

He felt Mike was essentially an American character. I think he's right. As somebody said above about LAC, otherwise he just becomes an obnoxious 'foreigner' and the plot gets skewed. :D I know "Mikes", unfortunately not with G's underlying charm and appeal. LOL

Jane

Hmmm, I guess I never considered anyone to be an "obnoxious foreigner" so I don't really understand that principle. However, the movie is done so it doesn't really matter, but thanks for clarifying it, Jane. :)

Having just watched Gerry on SNL this morning I can say that I LOVE LOVE LOVE hearing the brogue, but I can understand why he would need to use an American accent for his job. It's just sad that he feels almost ashamed and worried about going home with his accent toned down so much.

I bet it's back in full force by today, though. ;) I would really get a kick out of sitting around with Gerry and his family and listening to them all speak, and probably not understanding a damn word. :lol: I wouldn't care. How cool would that be?

Edited by phoenixgirl
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America has it's own culture, which is a blend of the many other people that settled here to make it what it is today. In my travels I've often heard people say that we have no culture, but in many of the places that I've been they've taken on a lot of the culture, and sub culture of the USA.

I often feel like a person without a homeland. I was born in the US and have lived here my whole life, but I've never really thought of myself as an American. I mean, I know I am, (because what else would I be?) but I've never really felt a connection to an American culture (oxymoron? Even if we were unified in that way I'd hesitate to call what we contribute to the world "culture"), or taken pride in being an American. I feel very out of place here.

That's why I am so impressed by how fiercely Scottish Gerry is. He obviously has more than a respect for his culture, more than a love... It's like Scotland is part of him, and he carries it wherever he goes. I bet he finds it laughable that people could accuse him of turning his back on his Scottish heritage.

I thought this article did a great job of communicating that which those of us who pay attention already knew: Gerry is a Scot, through and through.

Steph

After traveling to Europe, Middle East, the Gulf, and Asia I would say America def has a culture because people really take that sh*t on, LOL! Although, I know Europeans especially Brits like to say we have no culture, LOL. We are one of the youngest, if not youngest 'civilized' nations out there. I can understand you're feelings of being out of place because sometimes I feel that, especially in the ridiculous state that I live in. There are other places that I"ve been that I've felt a complete oneness, and peace being there even though I didn't speak the language.

I"m not proud of all the things that America has done, and continues to do in the name of democracy. Some of those things seem more Empirialistic than Democratic. I remember being in Ireland when Bush was reelected. F*ck! I really got sick of people offering me their opinions on the American Government, and the election process. Especially since I didn't vote for the man, LOL. The hardest thing is you get painted wiht the same broad brush as other Americans who happen to be batsh*t crazy and don't know how to act, or have some effed up political views, or don't get that the world isn't as happy about American/Americans as most Americans seem to think.

Overall my experiences overseas have been incredible, and the people always want to know about American cultures. Which things are real on tv shows, etc. It makes me laugh.

D

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Why is everyone so hopped up for Gerry to get married? Everything happens in it's own time. Things tend to happen when you least expect them. I'm sure he'll find the right woman to settle down with, and he'll eventually have children. Right now, he's enjoying the beauty of the world. The world is big, and their are a lot of beautiful people in it.

I believe that some, who have had a "positive" experience with marriage, just want him to be happy and feel that having someone to come home to and grow old with is the ultimate in happiness. However, sometimes marriage is not a happy experience and then it's expensive and painful to get out of it. And I've always contended that if you are going to be miserable, be miserable single rather than miserable married! Then you're only responsible for your own unhappiness and not someone elses!

I wish I had not jumped in to marriage so quickly. I thought I was so old at the time! I knew absolutely nothing! But at Gerry's age, he's been able to experience relationships and take from them the good and the bad and have the advantage of knowing what works and what doesn't and can take his time. Men do have the luxury I guess, where women have a time limit on having children, if that's their main motivation I guess.

Some people don't pull well in double harness. Gerry might be one of those people who might not. I believe that Gerry enjoys having a mate and partnership but doesn't like the restraints it can put on him, emotionally and physically. He mentioned the prospect of perhaps entering in to a relationship in the future without the legal binding contract of marriage, at least I think that's what he said. I can see that for him.

The part about kids, I think a lot of men kind of go in and out of wanting kids. Some men are like kids themselves and some are either paternal or they are not and right now, Gerry knows that he would not be able to commit himself to the role of a father as he would like to and that's really says a lot about Gerry in that he does not want to be an absentee father (I wonder why?). Some men marry and have kids and just basically leave the parenting off on their spouse/mate and that sounds like something he would never do.

With all that is going on in his career right now I think his mindset is wise. And I've heard him express the desire for children if they could start at about the age of three, although he may be kidding, Gerry "jokes" the truth sometimes. Sounds like the infancy thing is not a desireable thing for him and to be honest, even with my own son, that was my least favorite part of being a parent. It's very restricting and demanding, more so than any other time in a child's upbringing and where their imprinting is most crucial. You can really f**k them up if you're not careful! Perhaps adoption of a child would be a good choice for Gerry in the future, maybe a boy and a girl from India after the terrible twos!

I often feel like a person without a homeland. I was born in the US and have lived here my whole life, but I've never really thought of myself as an American. I mean, I know I am, (because what else would I be?) but I've never really felt a connection to an American culture (oxymoron? Even if we were unified in that way I'd hesitate to call what we contribute to the world "culture"), or taken pride in being an American. I feel very out of place here.

I have a strong Native American heritage that runs through my family and I can't help getting emotional when I travel here in the USA, the land and it's beauty. I'm always in awe of the country and the warmth and generousity of people. I think our cultural roots are so mixed now that it is hard to define but that's part of what the US is all about, the acceptance of many cultures, some good and maybe some not so good, unfortunately.

You've always got to have your home, your roots, no matter where you live. I lived in another country for a period of time and it made me so appreciate this one so much more, even with it's down sides and you will find those in most countries.

There was a moment in time when we had a chance to move to the UK and turned down the opportunity because you just can't go over there and buy a large piece of land in the country, not around London anyway, because it just doesn't exist unless you're very wealthy and I would move no where without my horses and animals.

I love the US and it will always be my homeland for many reasons, but home is where your heart is, isn't it? My heart is my animals.

Delene

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