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LadyinRed

What Gerard Meant when he said he was sent to "Buy Shopping"

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In reply to the comment below (I couldn't post in that topic as it was closed), but in Scotland if people say they are going to "buy shopping" or they are "going for messages" this means that they are leaving to go and buy food shopping. This was written by an American on another part of the site:

"Sorry but I'm reading & somewhat laughing. How do you "buy shopping"? Also I'm confused about the comment of something that happened 30 years ago. Gerry is about to be 40 in November. You aren't considered a "tot" at 9 or even 10. I'm guessing he left Paisley & moved to Canada at a much younger age meaning 30 years is too short of a time. Sorry it makes me giggle when someone can't write a proper article."

So for all the Americans on here you now understand what Gerard means if he was sent to buy shopping when he was a boy. It would have probably been Galbraiths in Seedhill, that was the nearest supermarket in the 70's next to Ralston where he lived. Galbraiths is now Asda, and this area hasn't changed much since the 70's, apart from the Kelburn Cinema is now flats.

Scotland is completely different to America in the respect that lots of supermarkets, shops etc are within walking distance to many houses. We don't have to leave housing estates to visit "malls." It is relatively safe to walk to shops etc in Scotland.

Paisley is famous to quite a few people in recent years, as well as Gerard, they have David Tennant who is (Doctor Who) and the singer Paulo Nutini whose mum and dad's chippy is around the corner from the old County Bingo, the next street from where Toledo Junction was.

ps. I grew up in Paisley till I was 10.

LadyinRed

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Interesting. It's funny how each locale has their own sayings. For instance, in New Orleans, when we go to the store, we "make groceries." If someone calls you while you're at the store and asks, "What are you doing?" The answer is "making groceries." Don't ask me how or why this grammatically offensive phase came to be, but "it is what it is." :lmao:

Thanks for the post.

:welcome:

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It's so true. Being from back east (NYC) and living in California I have said things that get me weird looks. I've pretty much acclimated myself to California terms, but I still say "close the lights". And now my boys just do it. LOL

By the way, can I ask which article LadyinRed is referring to?

Edited by phoenixgirl

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haha i always forget how some people wouldnt understand,

''going for the messages'' lol as in food shopping

:p

i love hearing all different ways of saying things etc :-)

xoxo

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It's so true. Being from back east (NYC) and living in California I have said things that get me weird looks. I've pretty much acclimated myself to California terms, but I still say "close the lights". And now my boys just do it. LOL

By the way, can I ask which article LadyinRed is referring to?

The original article/discussion is here. (I'm confused by Lady's indication that the thread is closed, as it is very open. However, since we're discussing Scottish vernacular, I won't merge the threads. (That's not to say the MS won't merge it eventually! ... but it will stay put for now.)

Bringing the thread back on topic, where does the term "chuff" come from? I've seen several Scots post, "I was 'chuffed.'" I THINK that's a "good thing." As an American, it reminds me of "chaffed," which is NOT a good thing! Well ... unless Gerry's the one who's done the chaffing! :lmao:

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It's so true. Being from back east (NYC) and living in California I have said things that get me weird looks. I've pretty much acclimated myself to California terms, but I still say "close the lights". And now my boys just do it. LOL

By the way, can I ask which article LadyinRed is referring to?

The original article/discussion is here. (I'm confused by Lady's indication that the thread is closed, as it is very open. However, since we're discussing Scottish vernacular, I won't merge the threads. (That's not to say the MS won't merge it eventually! ... but it will stay put for now.)

Bringing the thread back on topic, where does the term "chuff" come from? I've seen several Scots post, "I was 'chuffed.'" I THINK that's a "good thing." As an American, it reminds me of "chaffed," which is NOT a good thing! Well ... unless Gerry's the one who's done the chaffing! :lmao:

''chuffed'' means proud of in a sense

like if i said '' i was so chuffed with that cake i baked''

it means i was happy with it :p

haha

any more words you Gals need help understanding ?

love natalie

xoxo

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I love the discussion of regional vernacular! In watching more of Gerry's early work I've found myself using more British slang... or even if it doesn't come out of my mouth, it pops into my head! :D Then I read Trainspotting, and that was fun figuring all that out! (Luckily it has a glossary in the back!)

Just a quick note on "making groceries": I'm pretty sure this saying came about from the region's french roots. In french, there are many instances where they use the verb "faire," which in English translates most directly to "to make." And, sure enough, to do the shopping in french is "faire du shopping"! :D

Steph

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Just a quick note on "making groceries": I'm pretty sure this saying came about from the region's french roots. In french, there are many instances where they use the verb "faire," which in English translates most directly to "to make." And, sure enough, to do the shopping in french is "faire du shopping"! :D

Steph

I'm off to email family with this tidbit! THANKS!!

THANKS, also, for the explanation of "chuffed." I love it! I have other questions, but I can't think of them off the top of my wee noggin. "Ahll be back!"

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Thanks for the link, Hol.

My favorite is "numpty". The first time Moira called me that I 'bout fell out (another good city term). Now, it's part of my vocabulary. :lol:

Edited by phoenixgirl

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Yeah, I loved the numpty discussion on Craig Ferguson. I also love how surprised Gerry was when Craig said the audience wouldn't know what a numpty was. :) He lives in his own little world sometimes, huh? :wuv:

Steph

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Okay....I'll bite....What is Numpty?? ;)

:wave: Frannie

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Okay....I'll bite....What is Numpty?? ;)

:wave: Frannie

"Numpty" is basically a silly, moron, goober or goofy person. At least that's the impression I got when first heard.

Fits a certain male we all here know about!! Hmmm????

The Divine Miss S :rose:

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In South Carolina we just say "I gotta go to the store". :lol:

Soooooooooo boring.

But we do call all carbonated soft drinks "coke".

"Hey... get me a coke, will ya?" "Sure. What kind?" "Sprite." :rotflmao:

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Love this discussion! Reminds me of the "irish Gutter workshop" from last June given by Celine :lmao:

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I find a lot of these Southerners call soda POP! Um....huh?

Also if someone needs a ride I hear them say "I can carry you over" But I'm a learnin! Or I'm fixin ta! :p

I think I like that word numpty though.... that and crikey!

:wave: Frannie

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I saw above "close the lights" and in the South we say

"hit the lights" to mean turn them off.

We also say "over yonder" to mean "over there."

We have so much slang in the South that I would have to

write a book to tell it all. But if anyone has any questions

about Southern phrases they have heard and don't understand,

let me know.

Love him absolutely,

Sandy

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I find a lot of these Southerners call soda POP! Um....huh?

Also if someone needs a ride I hear them say "I can carry you over" But I'm a learnin! Or I'm fixin ta! :p

I think I like that word numpty though.... that and crikey!

:wave: Frannie

I thought "pop" was basically a very Northern thing. In the South

the oldtimers used to say "get me a soda", meaning coke, etc.

Most people in my generations just say "soft drink" when

referring to coke or pepsi, etc.

Love him absolutely,

Sandy

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LOL! In the Deep South -- or New Orleans anyway -- ALL "soda pop" is "Coke". Even if you want Pepsi, you ask for a "Pepsi Coke." Crush is "Orange Coke." About the only "exceptions" are 7up and "Strawberry Coke" which is also known as "Red Drink." This past weekend, I was home visiting for Thanksgiving. While at the movie theater, the kid in front of us ordered a "Blue Icee Coke." :rotflmao: (Icees are frozen drinks in the States)

Fun thread!

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Orange Coke - that's funny. :lol: And to me, those Icees are Slurpies because when they first came out only 7-11 carried them (in my world) and that's what they were called.

Also, my issue when I moved here was my accent. I think city phrases are the same, but I had such a strong Brooklyn accent that I was constantly asked to say things. Water, quarter (which I still say funny), etc. I no longer say "idea-r" though. LOL

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I grew up in Upstate NY then moved to Indiana (midwest) when I was 16. In NY it was "soda" and in Indiana it was "pop". Also even if you were wearing pantyhose in NY you called them "stockings" but in Indiana they were "hose". Another midwest thing I never got used to was pronouncing the word WASH as if it was spelled WORSH.

I'm trying to remember some of the terms that were different in Scotland. Oh yes, when we had the car accident the lady taking the accident report asked me if the "bonnet" was damaged. I had to realize we call that the hood of the car. I already knew the trunk is called the boot there. I think they had a different term for the fender too but I don't recall what it was. An elevator is the lift. Of course we have to remember that their chips are our fries and our chips are their crisps and our cookies are their biscuits (and I still haven't quite figured out what a digestive is, though it is some sort of cookie). I think there were some other phrases that were different from American phrases that I'll think of later.

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:funnyup:

(Don't get me started on Digestives! To. Die. For.)

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A couple other southernisms I know of are:

"mash the button"

"cut the lights"

I never heard anyone in NC refer to soda as pop, unless they were from the midwest. That's how my Mom used to say it, and my Grandma from Ohio still does. I believe I say soda, though I know when I was a kid a pretty much called it all Coke.

A couple of fun NOLA ones are that snow cones are known as snoballs (wasn't sure it wasn't something dirty when I first moved here...), and milkshakes are called "freezes". Ummm... I know there's more, but they aren't popping into my head. Oh yeah, well here we eat crawfish, and in other parts of the country (and in RNR) they're sometimes referred to as crayfish.

Regional pronunciation is fun too. My Mom is from the midwest, and she pronounces things with an ILL sound with more of an E vowel... so Milk sounds like Melk. And Pillow sounds like Pellow. And she hates it when I point it out, even though I'm not making fun.

Love this stuff. :)

Steph

Edited by AbandonThought

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Growing up in Virginia, we called soft drinks a "drink" ("Hey, get me a drink, will ya?" I switched to "soda" in my teens when my friends all said "soda". A glass of water was "a drink of water". :spit:

Turning the light off was "cut the light out". I never have figured out why it was said like that. :doh:

"I'm fixing to..." and "down yonder" are favorites of my hubby. I try my best not to say those. :lol:

This is so interesting...keep it up! Especially love the Scottish phrases.

Diane

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'' I think they had a different term for the fender too but I don't recall what it was.''

Susan, that would be the 'Bumper' sweetie,

In Durham where I grew up we called all soda/fizzy drinks 'Pop'.

Hugs,

Anna x

Edited by me to throw in a few words,

cushat, spuggy,

fogs, stot, stotty,

hadaway, hockle, gizzat,

hoy, plodge, spelk.

Edited by Anna

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