Jump to content
Gerard Butler GALS
Sign in to follow this  
LadyinRed

What Gerard Meant when he said he was sent to "Buy Shopping"

Recommended Posts

some of us over here call

fizzy juice

''ginger'' lol !

''can i have a glass ae ginger maw?''

lol there some scottish for ya's

do yous get irn bru in america:P?

xoxo

Only in specialty stores, Natalie. There's a UK grocery store in Santa Monica and when I was there about a year and a half ago I bought one. It's still in my fridge unopened. :lol: And in my freezer are a Mars bar, Highland Toffee and I think a package of those digestives.

My son loves Fanta Exotic, which you can only get in the UK as well. When he was in Europe three years ago he had some and we've been trying to get him some since.

What's fizzy juice? Is that what we call soda? LOL I'm so clueless on the Scottish/ UK vernacular.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

some of us over here call

fizzy juice

''ginger'' lol !

''can i have a glass ae ginger maw?''

lol there some scottish for ya's

do yous get irn bru in america:P?

xoxo

Only in specialty stores, Natalie. There's a UK grocery store in Santa Monica and when I was there about a year and a half ago I bought one. It's still in my fridge unopened. :lol: And in my freezer are a Mars bar, Highland Toffee and I think a package of those digestives.

My son loves Fanta Exotic, which you can only get in the UK as well. When he was in Europe three years ago he had some and we've been trying to get him some since.

What's fizzy juice? Is that what we call soda? LOL I'm so clueless on the Scottish/ UK vernacular.

ha aw i love irn bru !!! you should deffinetly try it

i wouldnt drink that one though keep that as a souvenir :Pbuy a new one then put it in the freezer for about 10 minutes serve it freezing cold it is amazing! have it with one of they mars bars ha

fizzy juice is like cola, fanta etc :p

yeaah just soda, i call it ginger ha !

love natalie xoxo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's so true. Being from back east (NYC) and living in California I have said things that get me weird looks. I've pretty much acclimated myself to California terms, but I still say "close the lights". And now my boys just do it. LOL

By the way, can I ask which article LadyinRed is referring to?

The original article/discussion is here. (I'm confused by Lady's indication that the thread is closed, as it is very open. However, since we're discussing Scottish vernacular, I won't merge the threads. (That's not to say the MS won't merge it eventually! ... but it will stay put for now.)

Bringing the thread back on topic, where does the term "chuff" come from? I've seen several Scots post, "I was 'chuffed.'" I THINK that's a "good thing." As an American, it reminds me of "chaffed," which is NOT a good thing! Well ... unless Gerry's the one who's done the chaffing! :lmao:

Hi,

I did try to post underneath the original quote but couldn't get it to work, (sorry for confusing everyone in trying to figure out where the original article came from)....

I grew up in Paisley which is approx 10 miles from Glasgow. The accent in Paisley is completely different from Glasgwegian accents. In Glasgow every part of the city has a different accent. In Paisley the accent is the same although some people in certain areas do sound more posh and may be more articulate.

Some confusing things which may be said from people from Paisley (and Scotland) include "I'd like a roll in sausage.... this isn't a sausage roll, but normally a flat square sausage insinde a cirular roll(bap) other things to do with food would be to say "I'd like a roll in ham."... which would mean bacon inside a roll....

Lift your bonnet- means lift the hood of your car

Open your boot- means the trunk of your car

Bumper of your car- Fender of your car

So if you are ever stopped by the police over here and they ask you to lift your bonnet and open your boot you'll know what they mean LOL....

Someone mentioned digestive biscuits, oh god I hate them, some people love them, they are circular, very dry and crumbly and some people dip them in their tea, sometimes people over here say that "that smells like a digestive biscuit"

Irn Bru I don't like the taste but lots of Scottish people drink it, I'm sure there must be loads more wee things, if I think of any or if there is anything anyone wants to know about Paisley just let me know.

Lady in Red

Edited by discoveringme
To move [quote]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah Irn Bru rocks !!! you should all try one at the Vegas Con next year seen as though its having a Scottish theme right? lol cool

hrrmm Scots / American (Canadian)wordings

fairground - midway

football - soccer

bonnet - hood

boot - trunk

stove - cooker

hoover - vacuum

fizzy juice - pop

toilet - washroom

oh i will add more when i think of them tonight lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Stu, Natalie and Anna and others :wave:

I am well versed on the football-soccer difference due to Gerry's slip of the tongue (hmmmm I like the sound of that :p Oh sorry...where was I? Lost my concentration there for a min.)

I knew about bonnet and boot from reading but the others I have not heard before. :doh:

Love learning something new.

:hugs:

Diane

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Isn't it funny how "toilet" isn't considered etiquette or something here in the states? Makes me think of Archie Bunker and "terlit". :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a question that might sound weird - it's for our Scottish members ...

I am wondering about men using the term "brother" between each other in Scotland. In the TV show Lost there is a Scottish character who says it all the time, and then Gerry used it in TUT (probably scripted, but it was so casually used). I'm just curious if that's something used a lot between men in Scotland?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a question that might sound weird - it's for our Scottish members ...

I am wondering about men using the term "brother" between each other in Scotland. In the TV show Lost there is a Scottish character who says it all the time, and then Gerry used it in TUT (probably scripted, but it was so casually used). I'm just curious if that's something used a lot between men in Scotland?

No I have never heard it all in Scotland, if guys here said that to each other they'd be given a weird look!!

Maybe younger teens/boys in ethnic gangs may use that phrase. In London and other English cities where there are more ethnic mixes it would probably be used. In Paisley and elsewhere in Scotland I honestly haven't heard it.

Do the other Scots living in Scotland agree? Or is this something you hear about the place?

LadyinRed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a question that might sound weird - it's for our Scottish members ...

I am wondering about men using the term "brother" between each other in Scotland. In the TV show Lost there is a Scottish character who says it all the time, and then Gerry used it in TUT (probably scripted, but it was so casually used). I'm just curious if that's something used a lot between men in Scotland?

No I have never heard it all in Scotland, if guys here said that to each other they'd be given a weird look!!

Maybe younger teens/boys in ethnic gangs may use that phrase. In London and other English cities where there are more ethnic mixes it would probably be used. In Paisley and elsewhere in Scotland I honestly haven't heard it.

Do the other Scots living in Scotland agree? Or is this something you hear about the place?

LadyinRed

nope i am 17 and none of the boys from my school say it unless they are having a bit of a joke like

'he's my brother from another mother''

for a laugh (not that its really funny)

i always thought i was an american thing !!

love natalie

xoxo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for answering! It bugged me whenever Desmond said it on Lost (all the time) and then when I heard Mike/Gerry say it I had to ask.

:thankyou:

Lisa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting topic here. I've always loved the term "Taking the Piss". I use it sometimes but only w/my international co-workers or international friends outside of work. I've tried to use it w/my American friends or co-workers and it just doesn't jive w/them. I work w/75% international people in my dept. w/a good number being from the UK. I have a few Scots here as well which makes it fun. I've learned quite a few little phrases but I just can't seem to work it into everyday conversation w/my American friends. Some get it but not all. I have a buddy from Spain who teaches me a lot as well , but I'll save those phrases for another day. So not appropriate. :funnyface:

Cassie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting topic here. I've always loved the term "Taking the Piss". I use it sometimes but only w/my international co-workers or international friends outside of work. I've tried to use it w/my American friends or co-workers and it just doesn't jive w/them. I work w/75% international people in my dept. w/a good number being from the UK. I have a few Scots here as well which makes it fun. I've learned quite a few little phrases but I just can't seem to work it into everyday conversation w/my American friends. Some get it but not all. I have a buddy from Spain who teaches me a lot as well , but I'll save those phrases for another day. So not appropriate. :funnyface:

Cassie

:lol: I agree. That's a funny one, and it's positive even though in my mind it sounds negative.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a quick note on "making groceries": I'm pretty sure this saying came about from the region's french roots. In french, there are many instances where they use the verb "faire," which in English translates most directly to "to make." And, sure enough, to do the shopping in french is "faire du shopping"! :D

Steph

I'm off to email family with this tidbit! THANKS!!

THANKS, also, for the explanation of "chuffed." I love it! I have other questions, but I can't think of them off the top of my wee noggin. "Ahll be back!"

I'm from Metairie orginally, I never understood the making groceries thing either. My family also says making dishes. Thanks so much for the French lesson. Sad, since I'm 75% french. C'est la vie. (sp?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"My son loves Fanta Exotic, which you can only get in the UK as well. When he was in Europe three years ago he had some and we've been trying to get him some since."

PhoenixGirl - we order Fanta Exotic and Fanta Lemon and Orange from GermanDeli.com.

Diane

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"My son loves Fanta Exotic, which you can only get in the UK as well. When he was in Europe three years ago he had some and we've been trying to get him some since."

PhoenixGirl - we order Fanta Exotic and Fanta Lemon and Orange from GermanDeli.com.

Diane

OMG Diane! If I can get this for my son, I will be the QUEEN! :lol: Thank you!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would someone please tell me what a "wind-up" is? I've heard it on several UK TV shows and could not figure out the meaning. Thanks!

Okay, I just answered my own question here: http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/index.htm

It's a pretty good site with lots of slang "translations."

Edited by ReggieNY11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Reggie! :)

Found in between "window licker" and "windypops" no less!! LOL Too funny!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LOL! In the Deep South -- or New Orleans anyway -- ALL "soda pop" is "Coke". Even if you want Pepsi, you ask for a "Pepsi Coke." Crush is "Orange Coke." About the only "exceptions" are 7up and "Strawberry Coke" which is also known as "Red Drink." This past weekend, I was home visiting for Thanksgiving. While at the movie theater, the kid in front of us ordered a "Blue Icee Coke." :rotflmao: (Icees are frozen drinks in the States)

Fun thread!

If you came to Australia and asked for a "Pepsi Coke" they'd ask you which one you wanted!! lol There's only one brand of coke and that's Coca Cola - in it's many forms: "real" or "normal" Coke, Diet Coke, Coke Zero. Mostly we refer to carbonated drinks as "soft drinks" and then just ask for the flavour or brand by name. But my mum (who's parents were from Scottish backgrounds - coincidentally my mother is supposedly related to Robbie Burns wife, Jean Armour) used to call soft drinks "fizzy drinks"). And my 4 year old nephew calls cola drinks "dirty juice" (not sure where he got that from!!)

Cheers,

Vicki

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you came to Australia and asked for a "Pepsi Coke" they'd ask you which one you wanted!! lol There's only one brand of coke and that's Coca Cola - in it's many forms: "real" or "normal" Coke, Diet Coke, Coke Zero. Mostly we refer to carbonated drinks as "soft drinks" and then just ask for the flavour or brand by name. But my mum (who's parents were from Scottish backgrounds - coincidentally my mother is supposedly related to Robbie Burns wife, Jean Armour) used to call soft drinks "fizzy drinks"). And my 4 year old nephew calls cola drinks "dirty juice" (not sure where he got that from!!)

Cheers,

Vicki

That has a whole different meaning on this board!

:lmao:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was watching House Hunters International last night and realized a few other differences:

Bathroom also called the loo.

What we call the yard they call the garden (for us a garden has flowers and landscaping, not necessarily true there)

The sitting room we call the living room

And I noticed when we were on the plane to London and then later in Scotland that when someone ordered a lemonade what they got was a 7-Up usually in the can. Here a lemonade usually isn't fizzy and is just lemon juice, water and sugar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was watching House Hunters International last night and realized a few other differences:

Bathroom also called the loo.

What we call the yard they call the garden (for us a garden has flowers and landscaping, not necessarily true there)

The sitting room we call the living room

And I noticed when we were on the plane to London and then later in Scotland that when someone ordered a lemonade what they got was a 7-Up usually in the can. Here a lemonade usually isn't fizzy and is just lemon juice, water and sugar.

Yummy, lemonade made like we did in the South (Virginia) with real lemons and sugar is my favorite drink. I rather have that than Coke or Pepsi (soda) any day.

Diane

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would someone please tell me what a "wind-up" is? I've heard it on several UK TV shows and could not figure out the meaning. Thanks!

Okay, I just answered my own question here: http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/index.htm

It's a pretty good site with lots of slang "translations."

I love learning all international slang - Aussie, UK esp Cockney, Irish, makes the experience more fun. I actually got a book on Aussie slang before I went there because I was worried I'd be too out of the loop to understand. Some slang in the book was actually outdated and that's the weakness of any book or site. The best thing to do is just follow along with what everyone else is saying. The Austin Power movies are fun for that. Mike Meyers's parents were British with English Scottish and Irish roots.

Having Aussie friends the funniest word is root. We say "I was rooting for this team or that to win" and rooting means shagging in Oz or to have a good root is to have a good shag, shag of course meaning to have sex, shag being UK slang. And if you use the word rooting in our context my Aussie friends always have to point it out or smirk or laugh.

Of course faggot is the UK word that has a very different meaning in North Amercia bwah [uK= cigarette] and always shocks you when you see a British movie using the term.

One thing I did notice is Gerry says s**t, excuse my English but I saw a movie, based in Scotland, probably Edinborough, maybe Trainspotting in fact and the actors were saying Shite as do many Irish folks, I love saying shite, sounds less profane to me.

But I have found even a city a few hours away from you in Canada can have its own slang from your own hometown. Slang or colloquiallisms are so fascinating. Some things stay regional or die or they catch on world wide. Like in my hometown many people call Tim Horton's coffee Scorchies because it is served so hot.

And poor Gerry and his soccer -football dilemma. I love the word "gridiron football" which is what the Aussies call our style of NFL/CFL football because the Aussies have soccer, rugby and footy, footy is Aussie rules football so they use gridiron football to distinquish Aussie rules from North American football. They consider it a sissy sport since we wear helmets and lots of padding.

Edited by lavender1960

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know this sounds bizarre, but I would love to hear Gerry say some Yiddish terms with his Brogue. They're funny words to begin with, and I'm sure coming out of Gerry's mouth I would roll.

Just a random thought ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know this sounds bizarre, but I would love to hear Gerry say some Yiddish terms with his Brogue. They're funny words to begin with, and I'm sure coming out of Gerry's mouth I would roll.

Just a random thought ....

I love Yiddish words,and alot of them are funny. One of my very dearest,bestest friends is originally from Brooklyn and she uses Yiddish words with me all the time,especially when she is ranting about something my ex has done,I catch the meanings to them pretty well,cause strangely enough, I've heard quite a few before.But I love'em and they are so fun to use with those who don't have a clue what they mean lol

As far as British slang,I picked up quite a bit of that from my ex-husband and his family.A few I didn't get and had to go look up and quite frankly,some of them make no sense at all to me.And I still use some of it because my children have picked them up and I guess we have to speak British slang and American both :lol: My ex-mil has moved to TN from the UK to live with my ex,so now whenever my kids are there for the weekend,they come home with a British accent.Which is hilarious when they are trying to argue with me and call me "mummy" intead of "mommy". But I do love looking up the slang terms for things in various countries,I always found slang to be much more interesting than just speaking without any at all. It's so imaginative and colorful ;)

Some of the slang around here...they call everything "coke"...and where I grew up just 2 hrs North of here...we call it "soda". Here they say "Cut the lights on" or "Cut that radio off" ....I don't get that one. Or they ask "Can you carry me to the store", when I first moved here I would be a smart butt and say "I can drive you to the store but I am NOT going to carry you"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Loving all this scottish chat!!!

I've just been watching episodes of "The young Person's Guide to becoming a rock star" on the website www.lovefilm.com where Gerry play's rock star Marty Claymore...it's a blast from the past!

I don't know if all you Gals have seen Gerry in this, but it is the ultimate in Scottishness! If you can get access to love film in the states you should have a look if you want to see a young Gerry being very Scottish. Just search for "The young person's guide to becoming a rock star." All 6 episodes are online and can be watched for free. xx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...